Album Review: Going Postal by Tourist Trap

By Abby Jeffers

Between surf-rock guitars and punky vocals, Tourist Trap’s latest album, Going Postal, feels like it belongs on a dark, grungy stage.

 Tourist Trap jams out at Soul Monsters' farewell show at Victory's Live on Aug. 25, 2017. (Photo by Dan Mitchell of Mitchell Multimedia)

Tourist Trap jams out at Soul Monsters' farewell show at Victory's Live on Aug. 25, 2017. (Photo by Dan Mitchell of Mitchell Multimedia)

The album title originated as a slang phrase, typically used when someone becomes vehemently angry or out of control. Even in its slowest moments, the energy and enthusiasm behind the album’s six alt-rock tracks easily matches the implications of its name.

Going Postal is nothing short of electric; edgy guitars and a tight rhythm section aid in maintaining a cool, unbothered tone without losing any of the music’s power. It has a gritty alternative rock sound with just a hint of blues and punk influence.

It is both cleaner and bolder than the band’s only other song on Spotify: “Hide & Seek,” which was released in 2016 and came before a lineup shift that seems to have bolstered the band’s confidence. Now, it seems as if Going Postal has carved out a corner for Tourist Trap, and that space allows the band to thrive and come to life.

At times, the album is fast and reckless. “Detour” is breathless and begs for a crowd to mosh along to punky vocals and imperfect-but-passionate guitar. On the other hand, Tourist Trap meanders through fuzzy guitar licks and clean rhythms at a nonchalant pace. “Say” has a smooth, rolling cadence that feels like it could be sultry if the candy-colored guitar tones could step aside.

Lead guitarist Nathan Weirich rips through gravelly, powerful solos in nearly every track. He effortlessly cuts through intricately layered rock instrumentals, adding a rugged second wind whenever the energy of a song might begin to suffer.

Going Postal closes with its title track, a groovy and smooth song that is punctuated by bright guitar riffs and rumbling bass. Lead vocalist Roberto Bryer croons, “I don’t have a plan/I’m just doing the best I can,” a line that is representative of the wandering melodies and soul-searching lyrics on other tracks.

Tourist Trap will open for Hail The Sun at Big Room Bar on Tuesday, April 24. The doors to the all-ages show open at 6 p.m. and tickets are $13. More information can be found on the show's Facebook page here.